Michigan State University
Michigan State University
Citizen Scholars
Showcase
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The Citizen Scholars Annual Showcase provides an opportunity for our students to share their research, creative activities, and experiences with their peers, our faculty, and the public. Offered near the end of each spring semester, the event showcases the discoveries, growth, and contributions of our students as they pursue their own academic interests, connect with local and global communities, and transform their own lives as they transform the lives of others.

The Showcase event invites students to adapt their work, express their ideas, share their experiences, and spread their knowledge in new forms, in order to reach broader audiences, open up new conversations, and generate new possibilities for collaboration and exchange.

Citizen Scholars Showcase Spring 2017

pamphlet.JPGThese presentations represent the ideas and issues students have engaged with in their courses, in their co-curricular activities, and in their own creative and scholarly pursuits. They demonstrate how CS students see themselves as members of a diverse, active community, how they engage with the questions and concerns of our time, how they see personal struggles unfolding within larger structural contexts, and how they think and act, individually and collaboratively, in ways that contribute to positive social change.
 
Sandra.JPGThe Citizen Scholars program wishes to thank all the faculty members who have helped CS students with their projects over the past year, in particular those who taught AL 110 and AL 210 courses. Their guidance, insight, and support have been invaluable in our students’ success.
- Sandra Logan, Program Director

"Their Showcase presentations reveal what it means to them to be Citizen Scholars."

Naomi Kamitha, Poster Presentation "Contextualizing Feminism"

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Miranda Kalinowski & Christian Keathley, "Reddit, Republicans, and Racism"

 

Gabriel Severson, Ted Talk "Balkan Conflict Awareness"

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 Jett Hampton, Presentation "Linguistic History of Malta"

Malta represents, in many respects, a living slice of history dating as far back as megalithic culture and Phoenician settlement. One thing that is crucial in understanding the small Mediterranean island is the complementary relationship held between history, economics, and language development. Poster pres.JPGIts location in the Mediterranean Sea has long been thought of as being a crucial position connecting the early northern European empires to those of northern Africa and the Middle east to the south. What this meant was that trade routes could be opened to swap and obtain the numerous natural resources that were available as well as allowing for early Neolithic farmers to take advantage of the temperate climate for grain production. This in turn attracted the attention of many early rulers seeking to claim these vital trade routes as their own along with gaining new territory in extending the wrath of their regimes. By exploring two crucial periods in Maltese history, The Shipwreck of St. Paul and The Arab Invasion, along with the religious and economic motives behind their occupancy of the island, we can better construct a model for understanding modern Maltese Language and the various interpretations of its origins.

 Isabel Humphrey-Phillips, Sculpture Presentation "Opposing Views"

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 Justin Wentland, Painting Presentation "Happiness"

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 Claire Gault, Poster Presentation "Ai Weiwei"

Claire.JPGAi Weiwei challenges rigid Chinese institution through conceptual art, activism in the face of adversary, and rallying a global support base through a new and unpredictable avenue -- social media. His unapologetic means earn him praise from both art critics and critics of government alike. If interested in learning further, watch his journey documented in the 2012 film, "Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry".

 

 Tiffanie Quinn, Poster Presentation "Women Artists You Should Know"

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